This is a long post—but we think it’s worth it!

30 years ago, something amazing happened — Bald Eagles were returning to nest on the Front Range of Colorado!

In 1988, a pair of Bald Eagles arrived at Barr Lake and decided to call it home. A small group of people decided to document and monitor that nest and Bald Eagle Watch was born!

Over time, this small grass roots effort expanded to include the monitoring of many other species and eventually grew into what is today Bird Conservancy of the Rockies, with monitoring programs in 15 U.S. states and Mexico. As Bird Conservancy grew, so did its efforts to monitor Colorado’s growing Bald Eagle population.

In 2018, Bald Eagle Watch collected data on more than 100 Bald Eagle nests, and citizen scientists donated almost 1600 hours to that effort. With Colorado’s Bald Eagle nesting population approaching 200, Bald Eagle Watch is now monitoring approximately half the nests in the state,and maintains the most complete database of Bald Eagle nesting in Colorado.

Data gathered through Bald Eagle Watch is shared with Colorado Parks and Wildlife and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to better understand and inform Bald Eagle management across the Front Range landscape.

THANK YOU to our our Bald Eagle Watch volunteers—and all of the citizen scientists that are helping us study bluebirds, colonial waterbirds, bluebirds, screech-owls, and more! The data you gather is an invaluable contribution to conservation!

To learn more about citizen science volunteer opportunities, visit: https://birdconservancy.org/get-involved/volunteer/citizen-science/


This is a long post—but we think it’s worth it!

30 years ago, something amazing happened — Bald Eagles were returning to nest on the Front Range of Colorado!

In 1988, a pair of Bald Eagles arrived at Barr Lake and decided to call it home. A small group of people decided to document and monitor that nest and Bald Eagle Watch was born!

Over time, this small grass roots effort expanded to include the monitoring of many other species and eventually grew into what is today Bird Conservancy of the Rockies, with monitoring programs in 15 U.S. states and Mexico. As Bird Conservancy grew, so did its efforts to monitor Colorado’s growing Bald Eagle population.

In 2018, Bald Eagle Watch collected data on more than 100 Bald Eagle nests, and citizen scientists donated almost 1600 hours to that effort. With Colorado’s Bald Eagle nesting population approaching 200, Bald Eagle Watch is now monitoring approximately half the nests in the state,and maintains the most complete database of Bald Eagle nesting in Colorado.

Data gathered through Bald Eagle Watch is shared with Colorado Parks and Wildlife and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to better understand and inform Bald Eagle management across the Front Range landscape.

THANK YOU to our our Bald Eagle Watch volunteers—and all of the citizen scientists that are helping us study bluebirds, colonial waterbirds, bluebirds, screech-owls, and more! The data you gather is an invaluable contribution to conservation!

To learn more about citizen science volunteer opportunities, visit: https://birdconservancy.org/get-involved/volunteer/citizen-science/